Bish

Chateau Sarco – France

Chateau Sarco – France

 

Built in the 19th century. Once owned by the ministry and sold in 2008 for just under 4 Million euro and abandoned ever since……

la Morgue Prelude - France

la Morgue Prelude – France

 

la Morgue Prelude – France

 

La Morgue Prelude is situated on a massive hospital site.

The hospital originally opened in the 1860’s, the hospital itself is still in use today but large parts of it is unused and getting renovated.

Atelier Central - Belgium

Atelier Central – Belgium

 

Atelier Central – Belgium

 

An old train depot that use to look after the traction engines of a nearby steel works. Cockerill Sambre site de Train repair

Château Lumiere - France

Château Lumiere – France

 

Château Lumiere – France

  History

Built in early 1900s, this house was owned by a tobacco tycoon from Switzerland. After the owner moved away in 1950s, the house was used for business purposes, and was sold multiple times before finally being left empty.

There isn’t a confirmed date it was abandoned, but the general consensus seems to say its in the 1980s.

Bowling World - Belgium

Bowling World – Belgium

Bowling World – Belgium

  Closed in late 2015. It closed due to a decline in custom and proposed development on the site of this bowling alley and dance hall next door.

chateau banana - france

Chateau Banana – France

 

Chateau Banana – France

 

Powerplant DC - Belgium

Powerplant DC – Belgium

 

 

Powerplant DC – Belgium

 

This was my 16th visit to Belgium for Exploring! Was a great little explore, only history I could find is below. It is a mix between DLSR and phone photos.

This power plant was built in 1960 and operated on gas . In 2014, the plant was closed. 40 jobs were lost.
It turns out that the electricity in the whole place is still working and the computers are still running!

Westbury House Nursing Home - Petersfield

Westbury House Nursing Home – Petersfield

 

Westbury House Nursing Home – Petersfield

 

Westbury was bought from the Gage family in 1866 by John Delaware Lewis. In 1904, the Times of London reported the heroism of his son, Colonel Le Roy Lewis, in saving the lives of some of his domestic staff from a devastating fire which destroyed the Palladian mansion:

‘The escape of the occupants was most exciting. The French governess, who occupied a bedroom at the rear of the main part of the house, raised the alarm at about 3am. Her cries were heard by Colonel Le Roy-Lewis, who immediately did what he could to rouse the family. Rushing out of his bedroom he found the staircase burning and the corridors filled with smoke, and all means of escape cut off. His first impulse was to save his five children, and he ran through the flames to the children’s wing and found that that part of the house was safe. Getting out of a window, he scrambled along a narrow ledge to a stack pipe, down which he slid to the ground, a distance of about 40 ft. He rushed to the stables, and with some difficulty roused the stablemen, and with the aid of three of them tried to raise a heavy ladder to the French governess’ window, but it fell and broke.’ 

‘Owing to the efforts of Colonel Le Roy-Lewis himself, no lives were lost by fire, but the housekeeper, an elderly woman named Jane Henley, who had been in the service of the family for many years, died on the roof from shock and fright before she could be rescued.’

‘The mansion itself is an old one, standing in a well-wooded park of 500 acres, and is in the Queen Anne style. It contained many fine pictures and some rich carving by Gibbons. Most of the rooms were wainscotted in oak, and there was a fine library. All these have been destroyed, only a few articles of furniture being saved. The family lost all their personal belongings.’

The gallant Colonel lost no time in rebuilding the mansion, regardless of cost. Ground-floor rooms included a ‘saloon or lounge’ (45ft by 27ft), with oak-panelled walls and housing a ‘three-manual organ, electrically blown’, an elegant drawing room (72ft by 21ft), fitted with mahogany glazed bookcases of Chippendale design, a dining room (32ft by 21ft), with painted panel walls; plus a study, boudoir and billiards room…. and so it went on, three floors of Edwardian comfort, including a passenger lift and central heating.

The estate was broken up in 1924, when Westbury House became a well-known and successful preparatory school, a use that continued for many years, until the 1980s when it was converted into a nursing home.

 

It closed in 2016 after a health watchdog found residents “were not protected from abuse and avoidable harm”. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-36474820

 

Coombe Park Estate - Whitchurch-on-Thames

Coombe Park Estate – Whitchurch-on-Thames

Coombe Park Estate – Whitchurch-on-Thames

  The Estate was originally created by James Gardiner who acquired the property in 1865 on his return to England from the East Indies. The development of the property was based upon a large principal residence in the classic style and landscaped parkland laid out by the renowned Humphrey Repton. Charles Howard acquired the estate in 1898 and a stud complex was added to the property to support the Howard family interest of breeding and racing horses. The stud produced many high quality racehorses, in particular Willonyx, who won 5 principal races in the 1911 season. By 1920 the estate comprised 670 acres.

 

 

 

 

The property was used as a rest and recuperation centre for the United States Air Force during the Second
World War and had by that time been passed to Mrs Lillian Howard upon the death of Charles Howard. Following the war years because of the large capital cost of refurbishment, the main part of the house was demolished leaving the existing house.

 

 

Maison du Cerf The Dentist's House - Belgium

Maison du Cerf – The Dentist’s House – Belgium

Maison du Cerf – The Dentist’s House – Belgium

 

 

 

 

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